Suzanne Awan

My journey into yoga began about ten years ago. At the time I was living in NYC working as a model. My work left me feeling empty inside, I knew there was more. I was drawn to learn about yoga and began studying and practicing at the Integral Yoga Institute. Soon after that I returned to Michigan and began practicing daily. Right away I recognized the many benefits of yoga. I then took a teacher training course and immersed myself in various styles of yoga including: Ashtanga, Kundalini and Bikram. I have also been trained in Phoenix Rising Yoga Therapy. Soon after, I began teaching yoga to kids ranging in ages from 3-13. Last summer I walked into the Yoga Shelter; it didn’t take long for me to realize what a treasure was awaiting inside. I completely connected on all levels with what was happening at The Shelter and the type of yoga that was being taught, Sanga Yoga... Community, exactly what I was looking for. I am so grateful for the teachings of Eric and Lisa. I have always been a seeker, looking for more understanding in life. I continue to learn and grow each day. When life’s greatest challenges come up, practicing yoga has helped me to remember who I am and walk with a little more grace. I look forward to sharing with you. Namaste


Suzanne Awan instructs the following:
  • Shelter Steady (slow flow)
  • Our slow-burn hatha style is a fully guided foundation-building slow grounded flow.Most forms of yoga in the West can be classified as Hatha Yoga. Hatha simply refers to the practice of physical yoga postures, meaning your Ashtanga, vinyasa, Iyengar and Power Yoga classes are all Hatha Yoga. Focused on going deeper into the breath, you are encouraged to keep your eyes closed on this inward journey, enhancing the ability to pay attention to feelings, and relax into your body even in periods of discomfort. Working to build endurance, we explore the balance of effort and ease using slower, cumulatively deeper pose sequences with longer holds designed to engage and strengthen not only the major muscle groups but to functionally integrate the entire body. In this slower yet challenging practice, within the boundaries and framework of personal individual expression, "everybody" is presented the opportunity to articulate both breath and posture. A longer Savasana rests and restores body and the mind.